Thuốc Kaopectate

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Thuốc Kaopectate
Thuốc Kaopectate
    For choline and magnesium salicylates

  • For oral dosage forms (oral solution or tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
      • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more)—2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
      • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds)—A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
    For magnesium salicylate

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain:
      • Adults and teenagers—2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    For salsalate

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    For sodium salicylate

  • For oral dosage forms (tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
      • Children 6 years of age and older—325 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 6 years of age—This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

Missed dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions while using Kaopectate

Check the labels of all nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) and prescription medicines you now take. If any contain aspirin or other salicylates (including bismuth subsalicylate [e.g., Pepto-Bismol] or any shampoo or skin medicine that contains salicylic acid or any other salicylate), check with your health care professional. Taking or using them together with this medicine may cause an overdose.

If you will be taking salicylates for a long time (more than 5 days in a row for children or 10 days in a row for adults) or in large amounts, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine. Sometimes serious side effects can occur without any warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, or unusual flushing or warmth of skin. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs.

Check with your medical doctor or dentist:

  • If you are taking this medicine to relieve pain and the pain lasts for more than 10 days (5 days for children) or if the pain gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs medical or dental treatment.
  • If you are taking this medicine to bring down a fever, and the fever lasts for more than 3 days or returns, if the fever gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs treatment.
  • If you are taking this medicine for a sore throat, and the sore throat is very painful, lasts for more than 2 days, or occurs together with or is followed by fever, headache, skin rash, nausea, or vomiting.
  • If you are taking this medicine regularly, as for arthritis (rheumatism), and you notice a ringing or buzzing in your ears or severe or continuing headaches. These are often the first signs that too much salicylate is being taken. Your doctor may want to change the amount of medicine you are taking every day.

For patients taking aspirin to lessen the chance of heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

  • Take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor. If you need a medicine to relieve pain, a fever, or arthritis, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
  • Do not stop taking this medicine for any reason without first checking with the doctor who directed you to take it.

Taking certain other medicines together with a salicylate may increase the chance of unwanted effects. The risk will depend on how much of each medicine you take every day, and on how long you take the medicines together. If your doctor directs you to take these medicines together on a regular basis, follow his or her directions carefully. However, do not take any of the following medicines together with a salicylate for more than a few days, unless your doctor has directed you to do so and is following your progress:

  • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
  • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
  • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
  • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
  • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
  • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
  • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
  • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
  • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
  • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
  • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
  • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
  • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
  • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
  • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
  • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
  • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
  • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
  • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
  • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
  • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
  • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)

For diabetic patients:

  • False urine sugar test results may occur if you are regularly taking large amounts of salicylates, such as:
    • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
    • Buffered aspirin or
    • Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
    • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
    • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
    • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
    • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.
  • Smaller doses or occasional use of salicylates usually will not affect urine sugar tests. However, check with your health care professional (especially if your diabetes is not well-controlled) if:
    • you are not sure how much salicylate you are taking every day.
    • you notice any change in your urine sugar test results.
    • you have any other questions about this possible problem.

Do not take aspirin for 5 days before any surgery, including dental surgery, unless otherwise directed by your medical doctor or dentist. Taking aspirin during this time may cause bleeding problems.

For patients taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates (e.g., Trilisate), or magnesium salicylate (e.g., Doan’s):

  • Buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate can keep many other medicines, especially some medicines used to treat infections, from working properly. This problem can be prevented by not taking the 2 medicines too close together. Ask your health care professional how long you should wait between taking a medicine for infection and taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate.

If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

  • Stomach problems may be more likely to occur if you drink alcoholic beverages while being treated with this medicine, especially if you are taking it in high doses or for a long time. Check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

For patients using aspirin suppositories:

  • Aspirin suppositories may cause irritation of the rectum. Check with your doctor if this occurs.

Salicylates may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge if you have taken any of these medicines within the past week. If possible, it is best to check with the doctor first, to find out whether the medicine may be taken during the week before the test.

For patients taking one of the products that contain caffeine:

  • Caffeine may interfere with the result of a test that uses adenosine (e.g., Adenocard) or dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) to help find out how well your blood is flowing through certain blood vessels. Therefore, you should not have any caffeine for at least 8 to 12 hours before the test.

If you think that you or anyone else may have taken an overdose, get emergency help at once. Taking an overdose of these medicines may cause unconsciousness or death. Signs of overdose include convulsions (seizures), hearing loss, confusion, ringing or buzzing in the ears, severe drowsiness or tiredness, severe excitement or nervousness, and fast or deep breathing.

Kaopectate side effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Symptoms of overdose in children

    • Changes in behavior
    • drowsiness or tiredness (severe)
    • fast or deep breathing
  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 mg of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 12 years of age—325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 9 years of age—Aspirin and caffeine tablets are too strong for use in children up to 9 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kg (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For buffered aspirin

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For buffered aspirin and caffeine

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 421 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 842 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets, or one 421-mg tablet, every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg or 421-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—162.5 or 325 mg (one-half or one 325-mg tablet) a day or 325 mg every other day. People who need smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For choline salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (oral solution):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—One-half or three-fourths of a teaspoonful every three hours, one-half or one teaspoonful every four hours, or one or one and one-half teaspoonfuls every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—2.5 to 3.75 mL (one-half to three-fourths of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 6 to 11 years of age—2.5 mL (one-half of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—1.66 mL every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—1.25 milliliters (mL) (one-fourth of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults—A total of five and one-half to eight teaspoonfuls a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 0.6 to 0.7 mL per kilogram (kg) (0.25 to 0.28 mL per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      For choline and magnesium salicylates

    • For oral dosage forms (oral solution or tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
        • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more)—2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
        • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds)—A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
      For magnesium salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain:
        • Adults and teenagers—2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For salsalate

    • For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For sodium salicylate

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 years of age and older—325 mg every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 6 years of age—This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

    Missed dose

    If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

    Storage

    Keep out of the reach of children.

    Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

    Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

    Precautions while using Kaopectate

    Check the labels of all nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) and prescription medicines you now take. If any contain aspirin or other salicylates (including bismuth subsalicylate [e.g., Pepto-Bismol] or any shampoo or skin medicine that contains salicylic acid or any other salicylate), check with your health care professional. Taking or using them together with this medicine may cause an overdose.

    If you will be taking salicylates for a long time (more than 5 days in a row for children or 10 days in a row for adults) or in large amounts, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

    Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine. Sometimes serious side effects can occur without any warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, or unusual flushing or warmth of skin. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs.

    Check with your medical doctor or dentist:

    • If you are taking this medicine to relieve pain and the pain lasts for more than 10 days (5 days for children) or if the pain gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs medical or dental treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine to bring down a fever, and the fever lasts for more than 3 days or returns, if the fever gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine for a sore throat, and the sore throat is very painful, lasts for more than 2 days, or occurs together with or is followed by fever, headache, skin rash, nausea, or vomiting.
    • If you are taking this medicine regularly, as for arthritis (rheumatism), and you notice a ringing or buzzing in your ears or severe or continuing headaches. These are often the first signs that too much salicylate is being taken. Your doctor may want to change the amount of medicine you are taking every day.

    For patients taking aspirin to lessen the chance of heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

    • Take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor. If you need a medicine to relieve pain, a fever, or arthritis, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
    • Do not stop taking this medicine for any reason without first checking with the doctor who directed you to take it.

    Taking certain other medicines together with a salicylate may increase the chance of unwanted effects. The risk will depend on how much of each medicine you take every day, and on how long you take the medicines together. If your doctor directs you to take these medicines together on a regular basis, follow his or her directions carefully. However, do not take any of the following medicines together with a salicylate for more than a few days, unless your doctor has directed you to do so and is following your progress:

    • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
    • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
    • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
    • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
    • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
    • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
    • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
    • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
    • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
    • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
    • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
    • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
    • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
    • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
    • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
    • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
    • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
    • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
    • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
    • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
    • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
    • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)

    For diabetic patients:

    • False urine sugar test results may occur if you are regularly taking large amounts of salicylates, such as:
      • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
      • Buffered aspirin or
      • Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
      • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
      • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
      • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
      • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.
    • Smaller doses or occasional use of salicylates usually will not affect urine sugar tests. However, check with your health care professional (especially if your diabetes is not well-controlled) if:
      • you are not sure how much salicylate you are taking every day.
      • you notice any change in your urine sugar test results.
      • you have any other questions about this possible problem.

    Do not take aspirin for 5 days before any surgery, including dental surgery, unless otherwise directed by your medical doctor or dentist. Taking aspirin during this time may cause bleeding problems.

    For patients taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates (e.g., Trilisate), or magnesium salicylate (e.g., Doan’s):

    • Buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate can keep many other medicines, especially some medicines used to treat infections, from working properly. This problem can be prevented by not taking the 2 medicines too close together. Ask your health care professional how long you should wait between taking a medicine for infection and taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate.

    If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

    For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

    • Stomach problems may be more likely to occur if you drink alcoholic beverages while being treated with this medicine, especially if you are taking it in high doses or for a long time. Check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

    For patients using aspirin suppositories:

    • Aspirin suppositories may cause irritation of the rectum. Check with your doctor if this occurs.

    Salicylates may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge if you have taken any of these medicines within the past week. If possible, it is best to check with the doctor first, to find out whether the medicine may be taken during the week before the test.

    For patients taking one of the products that contain caffeine:

    • Caffeine may interfere with the result of a test that uses adenosine (e.g., Adenocard) or dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) to help find out how well your blood is flowing through certain blood vessels. Therefore, you should not have any caffeine for at least 8 to 12 hours before the test.

    If you think that you or anyone else may have taken an overdose, get emergency help at once. Taking an overdose of these medicines may cause unconsciousness or death. Signs of overdose include convulsions (seizures), hearing loss, confusion, ringing or buzzing in the ears, severe drowsiness or tiredness, severe excitement or nervousness, and fast or deep breathing.

    Kaopectate side effects

    Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Get emergency help immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

    Symptoms of overdose in children

    • Changes in behavior
    • drowsiness or tiredness (severe)
    • fast or deep breathing
  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 mg of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 12 years of age—325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 9 years of age—Aspirin and caffeine tablets are too strong for use in children up to 9 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kg (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For buffered aspirin

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For buffered aspirin and caffeine

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 421 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 842 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets, or one 421-mg tablet, every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg or 421-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—162.5 or 325 mg (one-half or one 325-mg tablet) a day or 325 mg every other day. People who need smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For choline salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (oral solution):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—One-half or three-fourths of a teaspoonful every three hours, one-half or one teaspoonful every four hours, or one or one and one-half teaspoonfuls every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—2.5 to 3.75 mL (one-half to three-fourths of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 6 to 11 years of age—2.5 mL (one-half of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—1.66 mL every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—1.25 milliliters (mL) (one-fourth of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults—A total of five and one-half to eight teaspoonfuls a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 0.6 to 0.7 mL per kilogram (kg) (0.25 to 0.28 mL per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      For choline and magnesium salicylates

    • For oral dosage forms (oral solution or tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
        • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more)—2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
        • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds)—A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
      For magnesium salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain:
        • Adults and teenagers—2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For salsalate

    • For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For sodium salicylate

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 years of age and older—325 mg every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 6 years of age—This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

    Missed dose

    If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

    Storage

    Keep out of the reach of children.

    Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

    Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

    Precautions while using Kaopectate

    Check the labels of all nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) and prescription medicines you now take. If any contain aspirin or other salicylates (including bismuth subsalicylate [e.g., Pepto-Bismol] or any shampoo or skin medicine that contains salicylic acid or any other salicylate), check with your health care professional. Taking or using them together with this medicine may cause an overdose.

    If you will be taking salicylates for a long time (more than 5 days in a row for children or 10 days in a row for adults) or in large amounts, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

    Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine. Sometimes serious side effects can occur without any warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, or unusual flushing or warmth of skin. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs.

    Check with your medical doctor or dentist:

    • If you are taking this medicine to relieve pain and the pain lasts for more than 10 days (5 days for children) or if the pain gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs medical or dental treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine to bring down a fever, and the fever lasts for more than 3 days or returns, if the fever gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine for a sore throat, and the sore throat is very painful, lasts for more than 2 days, or occurs together with or is followed by fever, headache, skin rash, nausea, or vomiting.
    • If you are taking this medicine regularly, as for arthritis (rheumatism), and you notice a ringing or buzzing in your ears or severe or continuing headaches. These are often the first signs that too much salicylate is being taken. Your doctor may want to change the amount of medicine you are taking every day.

    For patients taking aspirin to lessen the chance of heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

    • Take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor. If you need a medicine to relieve pain, a fever, or arthritis, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
    • Do not stop taking this medicine for any reason without first checking with the doctor who directed you to take it.

    Taking certain other medicines together with a salicylate may increase the chance of unwanted effects. The risk will depend on how much of each medicine you take every day, and on how long you take the medicines together. If your doctor directs you to take these medicines together on a regular basis, follow his or her directions carefully. However, do not take any of the following medicines together with a salicylate for more than a few days, unless your doctor has directed you to do so and is following your progress:

    • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
    • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
    • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
    • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
    • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
    • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
    • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
    • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
    • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
    • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
    • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
    • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
    • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
    • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
    • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
    • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
    • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
    • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
    • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
    • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
    • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
    • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)

    For diabetic patients:

    • False urine sugar test results may occur if you are regularly taking large amounts of salicylates, such as:
      • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
      • Buffered aspirin or
      • Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
      • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
      • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
      • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
      • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.
    • Smaller doses or occasional use of salicylates usually will not affect urine sugar tests. However, check with your health care professional (especially if your diabetes is not well-controlled) if:
      • you are not sure how much salicylate you are taking every day.
      • you notice any change in your urine sugar test results.
      • you have any other questions about this possible problem.

    Do not take aspirin for 5 days before any surgery, including dental surgery, unless otherwise directed by your medical doctor or dentist. Taking aspirin during this time may cause bleeding problems.

    For patients taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates (e.g., Trilisate), or magnesium salicylate (e.g., Doan’s):

    • Buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate can keep many other medicines, especially some medicines used to treat infections, from working properly. This problem can be prevented by not taking the 2 medicines too close together. Ask your health care professional how long you should wait between taking a medicine for infection and taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate.

    If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

    For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

    • Stomach problems may be more likely to occur if you drink alcoholic beverages while being treated with this medicine, especially if you are taking it in high doses or for a long time. Check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

    For patients using aspirin suppositories:

    • Aspirin suppositories may cause irritation of the rectum. Check with your doctor if this occurs.

    Salicylates may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge if you have taken any of these medicines within the past week. If possible, it is best to check with the doctor first, to find out whether the medicine may be taken during the week before the test.

    For patients taking one of the products that contain caffeine:

    • Caffeine may interfere with the result of a test that uses adenosine (e.g., Adenocard) or dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) to help find out how well your blood is flowing through certain blood vessels. Therefore, you should not have any caffeine for at least 8 to 12 hours before the test.

    If you think that you or anyone else may have taken an overdose, get emergency help at once. Taking an overdose of these medicines may cause unconsciousness or death. Signs of overdose include convulsions (seizures), hearing loss, confusion, ringing or buzzing in the ears, severe drowsiness or tiredness, severe excitement or nervousness, and fast or deep breathing.

    Kaopectate side effects

    Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Get emergency help immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

    Symptoms of overdose in children

    • Changes in behavior
    • drowsiness or tiredness (severe)
    • fast or deep breathing
  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 mg of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 12 years of age—325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 9 years of age—Aspirin and caffeine tablets are too strong for use in children up to 9 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kg (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For buffered aspirin

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For buffered aspirin and caffeine

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 421 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 842 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets, or one 421-mg tablet, every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg or 421-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—162.5 or 325 mg (one-half or one 325-mg tablet) a day or 325 mg every other day. People who need smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For choline salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (oral solution):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—One-half or three-fourths of a teaspoonful every three hours, one-half or one teaspoonful every four hours, or one or one and one-half teaspoonfuls every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—2.5 to 3.75 mL (one-half to three-fourths of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 6 to 11 years of age—2.5 mL (one-half of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—1.66 mL every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—1.25 milliliters (mL) (one-fourth of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults—A total of five and one-half to eight teaspoonfuls a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 0.6 to 0.7 mL per kilogram (kg) (0.25 to 0.28 mL per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      For choline and magnesium salicylates

    • For oral dosage forms (oral solution or tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
        • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more)—2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
        • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds)—A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
      For magnesium salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain:
        • Adults and teenagers—2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For salsalate

    • For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For sodium salicylate

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 years of age and older—325 mg every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 6 years of age—This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

    Missed dose

    If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

    Storage

    Keep out of the reach of children.

    Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

    Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

    Precautions while using Kaopectate

    Check the labels of all nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) and prescription medicines you now take. If any contain aspirin or other salicylates (including bismuth subsalicylate [e.g., Pepto-Bismol] or any shampoo or skin medicine that contains salicylic acid or any other salicylate), check with your health care professional. Taking or using them together with this medicine may cause an overdose.

    If you will be taking salicylates for a long time (more than 5 days in a row for children or 10 days in a row for adults) or in large amounts, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

    Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine. Sometimes serious side effects can occur without any warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, or unusual flushing or warmth of skin. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs.

    Check with your medical doctor or dentist:

    • If you are taking this medicine to relieve pain and the pain lasts for more than 10 days (5 days for children) or if the pain gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs medical or dental treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine to bring down a fever, and the fever lasts for more than 3 days or returns, if the fever gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine for a sore throat, and the sore throat is very painful, lasts for more than 2 days, or occurs together with or is followed by fever, headache, skin rash, nausea, or vomiting.
    • If you are taking this medicine regularly, as for arthritis (rheumatism), and you notice a ringing or buzzing in your ears or severe or continuing headaches. These are often the first signs that too much salicylate is being taken. Your doctor may want to change the amount of medicine you are taking every day.

    For patients taking aspirin to lessen the chance of heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

    • Take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor. If you need a medicine to relieve pain, a fever, or arthritis, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
    • Do not stop taking this medicine for any reason without first checking with the doctor who directed you to take it.

    Taking certain other medicines together with a salicylate may increase the chance of unwanted effects. The risk will depend on how much of each medicine you take every day, and on how long you take the medicines together. If your doctor directs you to take these medicines together on a regular basis, follow his or her directions carefully. However, do not take any of the following medicines together with a salicylate for more than a few days, unless your doctor has directed you to do so and is following your progress:

    • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
    • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
    • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
    • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
    • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
    • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
    • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
    • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
    • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
    • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
    • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
    • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
    • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
    • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
    • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
    • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
    • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
    • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
    • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
    • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
    • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
    • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)

    For diabetic patients:

    • False urine sugar test results may occur if you are regularly taking large amounts of salicylates, such as:
      • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
      • Buffered aspirin or
      • Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
      • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
      • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
      • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
      • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.
    • Smaller doses or occasional use of salicylates usually will not affect urine sugar tests. However, check with your health care professional (especially if your diabetes is not well-controlled) if:
      • you are not sure how much salicylate you are taking every day.
      • you notice any change in your urine sugar test results.
      • you have any other questions about this possible problem.

    Do not take aspirin for 5 days before any surgery, including dental surgery, unless otherwise directed by your medical doctor or dentist. Taking aspirin during this time may cause bleeding problems.

    For patients taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates (e.g., Trilisate), or magnesium salicylate (e.g., Doan’s):

    • Buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate can keep many other medicines, especially some medicines used to treat infections, from working properly. This problem can be prevented by not taking the 2 medicines too close together. Ask your health care professional how long you should wait between taking a medicine for infection and taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate.

    If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

    For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

    • Stomach problems may be more likely to occur if you drink alcoholic beverages while being treated with this medicine, especially if you are taking it in high doses or for a long time. Check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

    For patients using aspirin suppositories:

    • Aspirin suppositories may cause irritation of the rectum. Check with your doctor if this occurs.

    Salicylates may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge if you have taken any of these medicines within the past week. If possible, it is best to check with the doctor first, to find out whether the medicine may be taken during the week before the test.

    For patients taking one of the products that contain caffeine:

    • Caffeine may interfere with the result of a test that uses adenosine (e.g., Adenocard) or dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) to help find out how well your blood is flowing through certain blood vessels. Therefore, you should not have any caffeine for at least 8 to 12 hours before the test.

    If you think that you or anyone else may have taken an overdose, get emergency help at once. Taking an overdose of these medicines may cause unconsciousness or death. Signs of overdose include convulsions (seizures), hearing loss, confusion, ringing or buzzing in the ears, severe drowsiness or tiredness, severe excitement or nervousness, and fast or deep breathing.

    Kaopectate side effects

    Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Get emergency help immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

    Symptoms of overdose in children

    • Changes in behavior
    • drowsiness or tiredness (severe)
    • fast or deep breathing
  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 mg of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 12 years of age—325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 9 years of age—Aspirin and caffeine tablets are too strong for use in children up to 9 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kg (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For buffered aspirin

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For buffered aspirin and caffeine

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 421 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 842 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets, or one 421-mg tablet, every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg or 421-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—162.5 or 325 mg (one-half or one 325-mg tablet) a day or 325 mg every other day. People who need smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For choline salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (oral solution):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—One-half or three-fourths of a teaspoonful every three hours, one-half or one teaspoonful every four hours, or one or one and one-half teaspoonfuls every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—2.5 to 3.75 mL (one-half to three-fourths of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 6 to 11 years of age—2.5 mL (one-half of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—1.66 mL every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—1.25 milliliters (mL) (one-fourth of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults—A total of five and one-half to eight teaspoonfuls a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 0.6 to 0.7 mL per kilogram (kg) (0.25 to 0.28 mL per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      For choline and magnesium salicylates

    • For oral dosage forms (oral solution or tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
        • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more)—2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
        • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds)—A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
      For magnesium salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain:
        • Adults and teenagers—2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For salsalate

    • For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For sodium salicylate

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 years of age and older—325 mg every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 6 years of age—This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

    Missed dose

    If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

    Storage

    Keep out of the reach of children.

    Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

    Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

    Precautions while using Kaopectate

    Check the labels of all nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) and prescription medicines you now take. If any contain aspirin or other salicylates (including bismuth subsalicylate [e.g., Pepto-Bismol] or any shampoo or skin medicine that contains salicylic acid or any other salicylate), check with your health care professional. Taking or using them together with this medicine may cause an overdose.

    If you will be taking salicylates for a long time (more than 5 days in a row for children or 10 days in a row for adults) or in large amounts, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

    Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine. Sometimes serious side effects can occur without any warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, or unusual flushing or warmth of skin. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs.

    Check with your medical doctor or dentist:

    • If you are taking this medicine to relieve pain and the pain lasts for more than 10 days (5 days for children) or if the pain gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs medical or dental treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine to bring down a fever, and the fever lasts for more than 3 days or returns, if the fever gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine for a sore throat, and the sore throat is very painful, lasts for more than 2 days, or occurs together with or is followed by fever, headache, skin rash, nausea, or vomiting.
    • If you are taking this medicine regularly, as for arthritis (rheumatism), and you notice a ringing or buzzing in your ears or severe or continuing headaches. These are often the first signs that too much salicylate is being taken. Your doctor may want to change the amount of medicine you are taking every day.

    For patients taking aspirin to lessen the chance of heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

    • Take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor. If you need a medicine to relieve pain, a fever, or arthritis, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
    • Do not stop taking this medicine for any reason without first checking with the doctor who directed you to take it.

    Taking certain other medicines together with a salicylate may increase the chance of unwanted effects. The risk will depend on how much of each medicine you take every day, and on how long you take the medicines together. If your doctor directs you to take these medicines together on a regular basis, follow his or her directions carefully. However, do not take any of the following medicines together with a salicylate for more than a few days, unless your doctor has directed you to do so and is following your progress:

    • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
    • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
    • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
    • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
    • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
    • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
    • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
    • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
    • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
    • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
    • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
    • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
    • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
    • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
    • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
    • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
    • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
    • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
    • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
    • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
    • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
    • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)

    For diabetic patients:

    • False urine sugar test results may occur if you are regularly taking large amounts of salicylates, such as:
      • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
      • Buffered aspirin or
      • Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
      • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
      • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
      • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
      • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.
    • Smaller doses or occasional use of salicylates usually will not affect urine sugar tests. However, check with your health care professional (especially if your diabetes is not well-controlled) if:
      • you are not sure how much salicylate you are taking every day.
      • you notice any change in your urine sugar test results.
      • you have any other questions about this possible problem.

    Do not take aspirin for 5 days before any surgery, including dental surgery, unless otherwise directed by your medical doctor or dentist. Taking aspirin during this time may cause bleeding problems.

    For patients taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates (e.g., Trilisate), or magnesium salicylate (e.g., Doan’s):

    • Buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate can keep many other medicines, especially some medicines used to treat infections, from working properly. This problem can be prevented by not taking the 2 medicines too close together. Ask your health care professional how long you should wait between taking a medicine for infection and taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate.

    If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

    For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

    • Stomach problems may be more likely to occur if you drink alcoholic beverages while being treated with this medicine, especially if you are taking it in high doses or for a long time. Check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

    For patients using aspirin suppositories:

    • Aspirin suppositories may cause irritation of the rectum. Check with your doctor if this occurs.

    Salicylates may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge if you have taken any of these medicines within the past week. If possible, it is best to check with the doctor first, to find out whether the medicine may be taken during the week before the test.

    For patients taking one of the products that contain caffeine:

    • Caffeine may interfere with the result of a test that uses adenosine (e.g., Adenocard) or dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) to help find out how well your blood is flowing through certain blood vessels. Therefore, you should not have any caffeine for at least 8 to 12 hours before the test.

    If you think that you or anyone else may have taken an overdose, get emergency help at once. Taking an overdose of these medicines may cause unconsciousness or death. Signs of overdose include convulsions (seizures), hearing loss, confusion, ringing or buzzing in the ears, severe drowsiness or tiredness, severe excitement or nervousness, and fast or deep breathing.

    Kaopectate side effects

    Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Get emergency help immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

    Symptoms of overdose in children

    • Changes in behavior
    • drowsiness or tiredness (severe)
    • fast or deep breathing
  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 mg of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 12 years of age—325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 9 years of age—Aspirin and caffeine tablets are too strong for use in children up to 9 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kg (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For buffered aspirin

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For buffered aspirin and caffeine

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 421 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 842 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets, or one 421-mg tablet, every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg or 421-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—162.5 or 325 mg (one-half or one 325-mg tablet) a day or 325 mg every other day. People who need smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For choline salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (oral solution):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—One-half or three-fourths of a teaspoonful every three hours, one-half or one teaspoonful every four hours, or one or one and one-half teaspoonfuls every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—2.5 to 3.75 mL (one-half to three-fourths of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 6 to 11 years of age—2.5 mL (one-half of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—1.66 mL every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—1.25 milliliters (mL) (one-fourth of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults—A total of five and one-half to eight teaspoonfuls a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 0.6 to 0.7 mL per kilogram (kg) (0.25 to 0.28 mL per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      For choline and magnesium salicylates

    • For oral dosage forms (oral solution or tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
        • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more)—2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
        • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds)—A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
      For magnesium salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain:
        • Adults and teenagers—2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For salsalate

    • For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For sodium salicylate

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 years of age and older—325 mg every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 6 years of age—This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

    Missed dose

    If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

    Storage

    Keep out of the reach of children.

    Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

    Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

    Precautions while using Kaopectate

    Check the labels of all nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) and prescription medicines you now take. If any contain aspirin or other salicylates (including bismuth subsalicylate [e.g., Pepto-Bismol] or any shampoo or skin medicine that contains salicylic acid or any other salicylate), check with your health care professional. Taking or using them together with this medicine may cause an overdose.

    If you will be taking salicylates for a long time (more than 5 days in a row for children or 10 days in a row for adults) or in large amounts, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

    Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine. Sometimes serious side effects can occur without any warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, or unusual flushing or warmth of skin. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs.

    Check with your medical doctor or dentist:

    • If you are taking this medicine to relieve pain and the pain lasts for more than 10 days (5 days for children) or if the pain gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs medical or dental treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine to bring down a fever, and the fever lasts for more than 3 days or returns, if the fever gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs treatment.
    • If you are taking this medicine for a sore throat, and the sore throat is very painful, lasts for more than 2 days, or occurs together with or is followed by fever, headache, skin rash, nausea, or vomiting.
    • If you are taking this medicine regularly, as for arthritis (rheumatism), and you notice a ringing or buzzing in your ears or severe or continuing headaches. These are often the first signs that too much salicylate is being taken. Your doctor may want to change the amount of medicine you are taking every day.

    For patients taking aspirin to lessen the chance of heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

    • Take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor. If you need a medicine to relieve pain, a fever, or arthritis, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
    • Do not stop taking this medicine for any reason without first checking with the doctor who directed you to take it.

    Taking certain other medicines together with a salicylate may increase the chance of unwanted effects. The risk will depend on how much of each medicine you take every day, and on how long you take the medicines together. If your doctor directs you to take these medicines together on a regular basis, follow his or her directions carefully. However, do not take any of the following medicines together with a salicylate for more than a few days, unless your doctor has directed you to do so and is following your progress:

    • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
    • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
    • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
    • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
    • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
    • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
    • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
    • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
    • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
    • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
    • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
    • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
    • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
    • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
    • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
    • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
    • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
    • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
    • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
    • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
    • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
    • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)

    For diabetic patients:

    • False urine sugar test results may occur if you are regularly taking large amounts of salicylates, such as:
      • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
      • Buffered aspirin or
      • Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
      • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
      • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
      • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
      • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.
    • Smaller doses or occasional use of salicylates usually will not affect urine sugar tests. However, check with your health care professional (especially if your diabetes is not well-controlled) if:
      • you are not sure how much salicylate you are taking every day.
      • you notice any change in your urine sugar test results.
      • you have any other questions about this possible problem.

    Do not take aspirin for 5 days before any surgery, including dental surgery, unless otherwise directed by your medical doctor or dentist. Taking aspirin during this time may cause bleeding problems.

    For patients taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates (e.g., Trilisate), or magnesium salicylate (e.g., Doan’s):

    • Buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate can keep many other medicines, especially some medicines used to treat infections, from working properly. This problem can be prevented by not taking the 2 medicines too close together. Ask your health care professional how long you should wait between taking a medicine for infection and taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate.

    If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

    For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

    • Stomach problems may be more likely to occur if you drink alcoholic beverages while being treated with this medicine, especially if you are taking it in high doses or for a long time. Check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

    For patients using aspirin suppositories:

    • Aspirin suppositories may cause irritation of the rectum. Check with your doctor if this occurs.

    Salicylates may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge if you have taken any of these medicines within the past week. If possible, it is best to check with the doctor first, to find out whether the medicine may be taken during the week before the test.

    For patients taking one of the products that contain caffeine:

    • Caffeine may interfere with the result of a test that uses adenosine (e.g., Adenocard) or dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) to help find out how well your blood is flowing through certain blood vessels. Therefore, you should not have any caffeine for at least 8 to 12 hours before the test.

    If you think that you or anyone else may have taken an overdose, get emergency help at once. Taking an overdose of these medicines may cause unconsciousness or death. Signs of overdose include convulsions (seizures), hearing loss, confusion, ringing or buzzing in the ears, severe drowsiness or tiredness, severe excitement or nervousness, and fast or deep breathing.

    Kaopectate side effects

    Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Get emergency help immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

    Symptoms of overdose in children

    • Changes in behavior
    • drowsiness or tiredness (severe)
    • fast or deep breathing
  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 mg of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 12 years of age—325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 9 years of age—Aspirin and caffeine tablets are too strong for use in children up to 9 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kg (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For buffered aspirin

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For buffered aspirin and caffeine

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 421 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 842 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets, or one 421-mg tablet, every four hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg or 421-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
        • Adults—162.5 or 325 mg (one-half or one 325-mg tablet) a day or 325 mg every other day. People who need smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
        • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For choline salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (oral solution):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—One-half or three-fourths of a teaspoonful every three hours, one-half or one teaspoonful every four hours, or one or one and one-half teaspoonfuls every six hours as needed.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age—2.5 to 3.75 mL (one-half to three-fourths of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 6 to 11 years of age—2.5 mL (one-half of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—1.66 mL every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age—1.25 milliliters (mL) (one-fourth of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
        • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults—A total of five and one-half to eight teaspoonfuls a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 0.6 to 0.7 mL per kilogram (kg) (0.25 to 0.28 mL per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      For choline and magnesium salicylates

    • For oral dosage forms (oral solution or tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
        • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more)—2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
        • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds)—A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
      For magnesium salicylate

    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • For pain:
        • Adults and teenagers—2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For salsalate

    • For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      For sodium salicylate

    • For oral dosage forms (tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets):
      • For pain or fever:
        • Adults and teenagers—325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
        • Children 6 years of age and older—325 mg every four hours as needed.
        • Children up to 6 years of age—This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.
      • For arthritis:
        • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
        • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

    Missed dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions while using Kaopectate

Check the labels of all nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) and prescription medicines you now take. If any contain aspirin or other salicylates (including bismuth subsalicylate [e.g., Pepto-Bismol] or any shampoo or skin medicine that contains salicylic acid or any other salicylate), check with your health care professional. Taking or using them together with this medicine may cause an overdose.

If you will be taking salicylates for a long time (more than 5 days in a row for children or 10 days in a row for adults) or in large amounts, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine. Sometimes serious side effects can occur without any warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, or unusual flushing or warmth of skin. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs.

Check with your medical doctor or dentist:

  • If you are taking this medicine to relieve pain and the pain lasts for more than 10 days (5 days for children) or if the pain gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs medical or dental treatment.
  • If you are taking this medicine to bring down a fever, and the fever lasts for more than 3 days or returns, if the fever gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs treatment.
  • If you are taking this medicine for a sore throat, and the sore throat is very painful, lasts for more than 2 days, or occurs together with or is followed by fever, headache, skin rash, nausea, or vomiting.
  • If you are taking this medicine regularly, as for arthritis (rheumatism), and you notice a ringing or buzzing in your ears or severe or continuing headaches. These are often the first signs that too much salicylate is being taken. Your doctor may want to change the amount of medicine you are taking every day.

For patients taking aspirin to lessen the chance of heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

  • Take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor. If you need a medicine to relieve pain, a fever, or arthritis, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
  • Do not stop taking this medicine for any reason without first checking with the doctor who directed you to take it.

Taking certain other medicines together with a salicylate may increase the chance of unwanted effects. The risk will depend on how much of each medicine you take every day, and on how long you take the medicines together. If your doctor directs you to take these medicines together on a regular basis, follow his or her directions carefully. However, do not take any of the following medicines together with a salicylate for more than a few days, unless your doctor has directed you to do so and is following your progress:

  • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
  • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
  • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
  • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
  • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
  • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
  • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
  • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
  • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
  • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
  • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
  • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
  • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
  • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
  • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
  • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
  • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
  • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
  • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
  • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
  • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
  • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)

For diabetic patients:

  • False urine sugar test results may occur if you are regularly taking large amounts of salicylates, such as:
    • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
    • Buffered aspirin or
    • Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
    • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
    • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
    • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
    • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.
  • Smaller doses or occasional use of salicylates usually will not affect urine sugar tests. However, check with your health care professional (especially if your diabetes is not well-controlled) if:
    • you are not sure how much salicylate you are taking every day.
    • you notice any change in your urine sugar test results.
    • you have any other questions about this possible problem.

Do not take aspirin for 5 days before any surgery, including dental surgery, unless otherwise directed by your medical doctor or dentist. Taking aspirin during this time may cause bleeding problems.

For patients taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates (e.g., Trilisate), or magnesium salicylate (e.g., Doan’s):

  • Buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate can keep many other medicines, especially some medicines used to treat infections, from working properly. This problem can be prevented by not taking the 2 medicines too close together. Ask your health care professional how long you should wait between taking a medicine for infection and taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate.

If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

  • Stomach problems may be more likely to occur if you drink alcoholic beverages while being treated with this medicine, especially if you are taking it in high doses or for a long time. Check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

For patients using aspirin suppositories:

  • Aspirin suppositories may cause irritation of the rectum. Check with your doctor if this occurs.

Salicylates may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge if you have taken any of these medicines within the past week. If possible, it is best to check with the doctor first, to find out whether the medicine may be taken during the week before the test.

For patients taking one of the products that contain caffeine:

    • Caffeine may interfere with the result of a test that uses adenosine (e.g., Adenocard) or dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) to help find out how well your blood is flowing through certain blood vessels. Therefore, you should not have any caffeine for at least 8 to 12 hours before the test.

    If you think that you or anyone else may have taken an overdose, get emergency help at once. Taking an overdose of these medicines may cause unconsciousness or death. Signs of overdose include convulsions (seizures), hearing loss, confusion, ringing or buzzing in the ears, severe drowsiness or tiredness, severe excitement or nervousness, and fast or deep breathing.

    Kaopectate side effects

    Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Get emergency help immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

    Symptoms of overdose in children

    • Changes in behavior
    • drowsiness or tiredness (severe)
    • fast or deep breathing
  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 mg of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 12 years of age—325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 9 years of age—Aspirin and caffeine tablets are too strong for use in children up to 9 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kg (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    For buffered aspirin

  • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
      • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
      • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
      • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    For buffered aspirin and caffeine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 or 421 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 842 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
      • Children 11 to 12 years of age—One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets, or one 421-mg tablet, every four hours as needed.
      • Children 9 to 11 years of age—One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
      • Children 6 to 9 years of age—One 325-mg or 421-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
      • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
      • Children 2 to 4 years of age—One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
      • Adults—162.5 or 325 mg (one-half or one 325-mg tablet) a day or 325 mg every other day. People who need smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    For choline salicylate

  • For oral dosage form (oral solution):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—One-half or three-fourths of a teaspoonful every three hours, one-half or one teaspoonful every four hours, or one or one and one-half teaspoonfuls every six hours as needed.
      • Children 11 to 12 years of age—2.5 to 3.75 mL (one-half to three-fourths of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
      • Children 6 to 11 years of age—2.5 mL (one-half of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
      • Children 4 to 6 years of age—1.66 mL every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
      • Children 2 to 4 years of age—1.25 milliliters (mL) (one-fourth of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults—A total of five and one-half to eight teaspoonfuls a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 0.6 to 0.7 mL per kilogram (kg) (0.25 to 0.28 mL per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
    For choline and magnesium salicylates

  • For oral dosage forms (oral solution or tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
      • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more)—2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
      • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds)—A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
    For magnesium salicylate

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain:
      • Adults and teenagers—2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    For salsalate

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    For sodium salicylate

  • For oral dosage forms (tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets):
    • For pain or fever:
      • Adults and teenagers—325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
      • Children 6 years of age and older—325 mg every four hours as needed.
      • Children up to 6 years of age—This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.
    • For arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
      • Children—A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

Missed dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions while using Kaopectate

Check the labels of all nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) and prescription medicines you now take. If any contain aspirin or other salicylates (including bismuth subsalicylate [e.g., Pepto-Bismol] or any shampoo or skin medicine that contains salicylic acid or any other salicylate), check with your health care professional. Taking or using them together with this medicine may cause an overdose.

If you will be taking salicylates for a long time (more than 5 days in a row for children or 10 days in a row for adults) or in large amounts, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine. Sometimes serious side effects can occur without any warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, or unusual flushing or warmth of skin. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs.

Check with your medical doctor or dentist:

  • If you are taking this medicine to relieve pain and the pain lasts for more than 10 days (5 days for children) or if the pain gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs medical or dental treatment.
  • If you are taking this medicine to bring down a fever, and the fever lasts for more than 3 days or returns, if the fever gets worse, if new symptoms occur, or if redness or swelling is present. These could be signs of a serious condition that needs treatment.
  • If you are taking this medicine for a sore throat, and the sore throat is very painful, lasts for more than 2 days, or occurs together with or is followed by fever, headache, skin rash, nausea, or vomiting.
  • If you are taking this medicine regularly, as for arthritis (rheumatism), and you notice a ringing or buzzing in your ears or severe or continuing headaches. These are often the first signs that too much salicylate is being taken. Your doctor may want to change the amount of medicine you are taking every day.

For patients taking aspirin to lessen the chance of heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

  • Take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor. If you need a medicine to relieve pain, a fever, or arthritis, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
  • Do not stop taking this medicine for any reason without first checking with the doctor who directed you to take it.

Taking certain other medicines together with a salicylate may increase the chance of unwanted effects. The risk will depend on how much of each medicine you take every day, and on how long you take the medicines together. If your doctor directs you to take these medicines together on a regular basis, follow his or her directions carefully. However, do not take any of the following medicines together with a salicylate for more than a few days, unless your doctor has directed you to do so and is following your progress:

  • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
  • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
  • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
  • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
  • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
  • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
  • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
  • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
  • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
  • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
  • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
  • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
  • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
  • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
  • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
  • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
  • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
  • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
  • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
  • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
  • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
  • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)

For diabetic patients:

  • False urine sugar test results may occur if you are regularly taking large amounts of salicylates, such as:
    • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
    • Buffered aspirin or
    • Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
    • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
    • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
    • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
    • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.
  • Smaller doses or occasional use of salicylates usually will not affect urine sugar tests. However, check with your health care professional (especially if your diabetes is not well-controlled) if:
    • you are not sure how much salicylate you are taking every day.
    • you notice any change in your urine sugar test results.
    • you have any other questions about this possible problem.

Do not take aspirin for 5 days before any surgery, including dental surgery, unless otherwise directed by your medical doctor or dentist. Taking aspirin during this time may cause bleeding problems.

For patients taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates (e.g., Trilisate), or magnesium salicylate (e.g., Doan’s):

  • Buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate can keep many other medicines, especially some medicines used to treat infections, from working properly. This problem can be prevented by not taking the 2 medicines too close together. Ask your health care professional how long you should wait between taking a medicine for infection and taking buffered aspirin, choline and magnesium salicylates, or magnesium salicylate.

If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

  • Stomach problems may be more likely to occur if you drink alcoholic beverages while being treated with this medicine, especially if you are taking it in high doses or for a long time. Check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

For patients using aspirin suppositories:

  • Aspirin suppositories may cause irritation of the rectum. Check with your doctor if this occurs.

Salicylates may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge if you have taken any of these medicines within the past week. If possible, it is best to check with the doctor first, to find out whether the medicine may be taken during the week before the test.

For patients taking one of the products that contain caffeine:

  • Caffeine may interfere with the result of a test that uses adenosine (e.g., Adenocard) or dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) to help find out how well your blood is flowing through certain blood vessels. Therefore, you should not have any caffeine for at least 8 to 12 hours before the test.

If you think that you or anyone else may have taken an overdose, get emergency help at once. Taking an overdose of these medicines may cause unconsciousness or death. Signs of overdose include convulsions (seizures), hearing loss, confusion, ringing or buzzing in the ears, severe drowsiness or tiredness, severe excitement or nervousness, and fast or deep breathing.

Kaopectate side effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Symptoms of overdose in children

  • Changes in behavior
  • drowsiness or tiredness (severe)
  • fast or deep breathing
  • Any loss of hearing
  • bloody urine
  • confusion
  • convulsions (seizures)
  • diarrhea (severe or continuing)
  • difficulty in swallowing
  • dizziness, lightheadedness, or feeling faint (severe)
  • drowsiness (severe)
  • excitement or nervousness (severe)
  • fast or deep breathing
  • flushing, redness, or other change in skin color
  • hallucinations (seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there)
  • increased sweating
  • increased thirst
  • nausea or vomiting (severe or continuing)
  • shortness of breath, troubled breathing, tightness in chest, or wheezing
  • stomach pain (severe or continuing)
  • swelling of eyelids, face, or lips
  • unexplained fever
  • uncontrollable flapping movements of the hands (especially in elderly patients)
  • vision problems

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common or rare

  • Abdominal or stomach pain, cramping, or burning (severe)
  • bloody or black, tarry stools
  • headache (severe or continuing)
  • ringing or buzzing in ears (continuing)
  • skin rash, hives, or itching
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  • Abdominal or stomach cramps, pain, or discomfort (mild to moderate)
  • heartburn or indigestion
  • nausea or vomiting

Less common

  • Trouble in sleeping, nervousness, or jitters (only for products containing caffeine)

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Seek emergency medical attention or call 115

Further information

The content of Holevn is solely for the purpose of providing information about Thuốc Kaopectate  and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please contact your nearest doctor or clinic, hospital for advice. We do not accept liability if the patient arbitrarily uses the drug without following a doctor’s prescription.

Reference from: https://www.drugs.com/cons/kaopectate-oral-rectal.html

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