Thuốc Budesonide (Systemic)

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Thuốc Budesonide (Systemic)
Thuốc Budesonide (Systemic)

• Systemic sclerosis: Use with caution in patients with systemic sclerosis; an increase in scleroderma renal crisis incidence has been observed with corticosteroid use. Monitor BP and renal function in patients with systemic sclerosis treated with corticosteroids (EULAR [Kowal-Bielecka 2017]).

• Thyroid disease: Changes in thyroid status may necessitate dosage adjustments; metabolic clearance of corticosteroids increases in hyperthyroid patients and decreases in hypothyroid ones.

Concurrent therapy issues:

• Drug-drug interactions: Potentially significant interactions may exist, requiring dose or frequency adjustment, additional monitoring, and/or selection of alternative therapy. Consult drug interactions database for more detailed information.

Dosage form specific issues:

• Polysorbate 80: Some dosage forms may contain polysorbate 80 (also known as Tweens). Hypersensitivity reactions, usually a delayed reaction, have been reported following exposure to pharmaceutical products containing polysorbate 80 in certain individuals (Isaksson 2002; Lucente 2000; Shelley 1995). Thrombocytopenia, ascites, pulmonary deterioration, and renal and hepatic failure have been reported in premature neonates after receiving parenteral products containing polysorbate 80 (Alade 1986; CDC 1984). See manufacturer’s labeling.

Monitoring Parameters

Serum glucose, electrolytes; blood pressure, weight and other growth parameters, presence of infection; monitor IOP with therapy >6 weeks; bone mineral density; assess HPA axis suppression (eg, ACTH stimulation test, morning plasma cortisol test, urinary free cortisol test)

Pregnancy Considerations

Some studies have shown an association between first trimester systemic corticosteroid use and oral clefts (Park-Wyllie 2000; Pradat 2003). Systemic corticosteroids may also influence fetal growth (decreased birth weight); however, information is conflicting (Lunghi 2010). Hypoadrenalism may occur in newborns following maternal use of corticosteroids in pregnancy (monitor). When systemic corticosteroids are needed in pregnancy, it is generally recommended to use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration of time, avoiding high doses during the first trimester (Leachman 2006; Lunghi 2010). Budesonide may be used for the induction of remission in pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease (Habal 2012; Nguyen 2016).

Patient Education

What is this drug used for?

• It is used to treat Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis.

• It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

Frequently reported side effects of this drug

• Common cold symptoms

• Heartburn

• Nausea

• Vomiting

• Diarrhea

• Passing gas

• Joint pain

• Back pain

• Abdominal pain

Other side effects of this drug: Talk with your doctor right away if you have any of these signs of:

• High blood sugar like confusion, fatigue, increased thirst, increased hunger, passing a lot of urine, flushing, fast breathing, or breath that smells like fruit

• Skin changes like acne, stretch marks, slow healing, or hair growth

• Bleeding like vomiting blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; coughing up blood; blood in the urine; black, red, or tarry stools; bleeding from the gums; abnormal vaginal bleeding; bruises without a reason or that get bigger; or any severe or persistent bleeding

• Infection

• Adrenal gland problems like severe nausea, vomiting, severe dizziness, passing out, muscle weakness, severe fatigue, mood changes, lack of appetite, or weight loss

• Moon face

• Buffalo hump

• Severe loss of strength and energy

• Irritability

• Tremors

• Fast heartbeat

• Confusion

• Sweating a lot

• Dizziness

• Passing out

• Swelling of the ankles

• Severe headache

• Bone pain

• Vision changes

• Signs of a significant reaction like wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; seizures; or swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all side effects. Talk to your doctor if you have questions.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer: This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Further information

The content of Holevn is solely for the purpose of providing information about Thuốc Budesonide (Systemic)  and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please contact your nearest doctor or clinic, hospital for advice. We do not accept liability if the patient arbitrarily uses the drug without following a doctor’s prescription.

Reference from: https://www.drugs.com/ppa/budesonide-systemic.html

Cardiovascular: Chest pain (<5%), edema (<5%), facial edema (<5%), flushing (<5%), hypertension (<5%), palpitations (<5%), tachycardia (<5%)

Central nervous system: Dizziness (<5% to 7%), fatigue (3% to 5%), agitation (<5%), amnesia (<5%), confusion (<5%), drowsiness (<5%), insomnia (<5%), malaise (<5%), nervousness (<5%), paresthesia (<5%), sleep disorder (<5%), vertigo (<5%)

Dermatologic: Alopecia (<5%), dermatitis (<5%), dermatological disease (<5%), diaphoresis (<5%), eczema (<5%)

Endocrine & metabolic: Hirsutism (≤5%), hypokalemia (1% to <5%), intermenstrual bleeding (<5%), menstrual disease (<5%), weight gain (<5%), adrenocortical insufficiency (foam 4%; capsules >1%), redistribution of body fat (1%)

Gastrointestinal: Diarrhea (10%), dyspepsia (6%), anal disease (<5%), enteritis (<5%), epigastric pain (<5%), exacerbation of Crohn’s disease (<5%), gastrointestinal fistula (<5%), glossitis (<5%), hemorrhoids (<5%), increased appetite (<5%), intestinal obstruction (<5%), oral candidiasis (<5%), upper abdominal pain (3% to 4%), flatulence (3%), abdominal distention (2%), constipation (2%)

Genitourinary: Urinary tract infection (2% to <5%), dysuria (<5%), nocturia (<5%), urinary frequency (<5%), hematuria (≥1%), pyuria (≥1%)

Hematologic & oncologic: C-reactive protein increased (1% to <5%), leukocytosis (1% to <5%), purpura (<5%), abnormal neutrophils (≥1%), anemia (≥1%), increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (≥1%)

Hepatic: Increased serum alkaline phosphatase (≥1%)

Hypersensitivity: Tongue edema (<5%)

Infection: Viral infection (6%), abscess (<5%)

Neuromuscular & skeletal: Ankle edema (7%), arthralgia (5%), arthritis (≤5%), hyperkinesia (<5%), muscle cramps (<5%), myalgia (<5%), tremor (<5%), weakness (<5%)

Ophthalmic: Eye disease (<5%), visual disturbance (<5%)

Otic: Otic infection (<5%)

Respiratory: Sinusitis (8%), bronchitis (<5%), dyspnea (<5%), flu-like symptoms (<5%), pharyngeal disease (<5%), rhinitis (<5%)

Miscellaneous: Fever (<5%)

<1%, postmarketing, and/or case reports: Allergic dermatitis, anaphylaxis, emotional lability, hyperglycemia, maculopapular rash, pancreatitis, peripheral edema, pruritus, pseudotumor cerebri, rectal bleeding, skin rash

Warnings/Precautions

Concerns related to adverse effects:

• Adrenal suppression: May cause hypercortisolism or suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, particularly in younger children or in patients receiving high doses for prolonged periods. HPA axis suppression may lead to adrenal crisis. Withdrawal and discontinuation of a corticosteroid should be done slowly and carefully. Particular care is required when patients are transferred from systemic corticosteroids to inhaled products or corticosteroids with lower systemic effect due to possible adrenal insufficiency or withdrawal from steroids, including an increase in allergic symptoms. Adult patients receiving >20 mg per day of prednisone (or equivalent) may be most susceptible. Fatalities have occurred due to adrenal insufficiency in asthmatic patients during and after transfer from systemic corticosteroids to aerosol steroids; aerosol steroids do not provide the systemic steroid needed to treat patients having trauma, surgery, or infections.

• Anaphylactoid reactions: Rare cases of anaphylactoid reactions have been observed in patients receiving corticosteroids.

• Immunosuppression: Prolonged use of corticosteroids may increase the incidence of secondary infection, mask acute infection (including fungal infections), prolong or exacerbate viral infections, or limit response to killed or inactivated vaccines. Exposure to chickenpox or measles should be avoided; corticosteroids should not be used to treat ocular herpes simplex. Corticosteroids should not be used for cerebral malaria, fungal infections, viral hepatitis. Close observation is required in patients with latent tuberculosis and/or TB reactivity; restrict use in active TB (only fulminating or disseminated TB in conjunction with antituberculosis treatment). Amebiasis should be ruled out in any patient with recent travel to tropic climates or unexplained diarrhea prior to initiation of corticosteroids. Use with extreme caution in patients with Strongyloides infections; hyperinfection, dissemination and fatalities have occurred.

• Kaposi sarcoma: Prolonged treatment with corticosteroids has been associated with the development of Kaposi sarcoma (case reports); if noted, discontinuation of therapy should be considered (Goedert 2002).

• Myopathy: Acute myopathy has been reported with high-dose corticosteroids, usually in patients with neuromuscular transmission disorders; may involve ocular and/or respiratory muscles; monitor creatine kinase; recovery may be delayed.

• Psychiatric disturbances: Corticosteroid use may cause psychiatric disturbances, including euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, severe depression or psychotic manifestations. Preexisting psychiatric conditions may be exacerbated by corticosteroid use.

Disease-related concerns:

• Cardiovascular disease: Use with caution in patients with HF and/or hypertension; use has been associated with fluid retention, electrolyte disturbances, and hypertension. Use with caution following acute MI; corticosteroids have been associated with myocardial rupture.

• Diabetes: Use corticosteroids with caution in patients with diabetes mellitus; may alter glucose production/regulation leading to hyperglycemia.

• Gastrointestinal disease: Use with caution in patients with GI diseases (diverticulitis, fresh intestinal anastomoses, active or latent peptic ulcer, ulcerative colitis, abscess or other pyogenic infection) due to perforation risk.

• Hepatic impairment: Avoid use in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class C). Consider reduced dosage in patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class B); monitor for hypercortisolism. Long-term use of corticosteroids in patients with hepatic impairment, including cirrhosis, has been associated with fluid retention.

• Myasthenia gravis: Use with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis; exacerbation of symptoms has occurred especially during initial treatment with corticosteroids.

• Ocular disease: Use with caution in patients with cataracts and/or glaucoma; increased intraocular pressure, open-angle glaucoma, and cataracts have occurred with prolonged use. Consider routine eye exams in chronic users.

• Osteoporosis: Use with caution in patients with osteoporosis; high doses and/or long-term use of corticosteroids have been associated with increased bone loss and osteoporotic fractures.

• Renal impairment: Use with caution in patients with renal impairment; fluid retention may occur.

• Seizure disorders: Use corticosteroids with caution in patients with a history of seizure disorder; seizures have been reported with adrenal crisis.

• Systemic sclerosis: Use with caution in patients with systemic sclerosis; an increase in scleroderma renal crisis incidence has been observed with corticosteroid use. Monitor BP and renal function in patients with systemic sclerosis treated with corticosteroids (EULAR [Kowal-Bielecka 2017]).

• Thyroid disease: Changes in thyroid status may necessitate dosage adjustments; metabolic clearance of corticosteroids increases in hyperthyroid patients and decreases in hypothyroid ones.

Concurrent therapy issues:

• Drug-drug interactions: Potentially significant interactions may exist, requiring dose or frequency adjustment, additional monitoring, and/or selection of alternative therapy. Consult drug interactions database for more detailed information.

Dosage form specific issues:

• Polysorbate 80: Some dosage forms may contain polysorbate 80 (also known as Tweens). Hypersensitivity reactions, usually a delayed reaction, have been reported following exposure to pharmaceutical products containing polysorbate 80 in certain individuals (Isaksson 2002; Lucente 2000; Shelley 1995). Thrombocytopenia, ascites, pulmonary deterioration, and renal and hepatic failure have been reported in premature neonates after receiving parenteral products containing polysorbate 80 (Alade 1986; CDC 1984). See manufacturer’s labeling.

Monitoring Parameters

Serum glucose, electrolytes; blood pressure, weight and other growth parameters, presence of infection; monitor IOP with therapy >6 weeks; bone mineral density; assess HPA axis suppression (eg, ACTH stimulation test, morning plasma cortisol test, urinary free cortisol test)

Pregnancy Considerations

Some studies have shown an association between first trimester systemic corticosteroid use and oral clefts (Park-Wyllie 2000; Pradat 2003). Systemic corticosteroids may also influence fetal growth (decreased birth weight); however, information is conflicting (Lunghi 2010). Hypoadrenalism may occur in newborns following maternal use of corticosteroids in pregnancy (monitor). When systemic corticosteroids are needed in pregnancy, it is generally recommended to use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration of time, avoiding high doses during the first trimester (Leachman 2006; Lunghi 2010). Budesonide may be used for the induction of remission in pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease (Habal 2012; Nguyen 2016).

Patient Education

What is this drug used for?

• It is used to treat Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis.

• It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

Frequently reported side effects of this drug

• Common cold symptoms

• Heartburn

• Nausea

• Vomiting

• Diarrhea

• Passing gas

• Joint pain

• Back pain

• Abdominal pain

Other side effects of this drug: Talk with your doctor right away if you have any of these signs of:

• High blood sugar like confusion, fatigue, increased thirst, increased hunger, passing a lot of urine, flushing, fast breathing, or breath that smells like fruit

• Skin changes like acne, stretch marks, slow healing, or hair growth

• Bleeding like vomiting blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; coughing up blood; blood in the urine; black, red, or tarry stools; bleeding from the gums; abnormal vaginal bleeding; bruises without a reason or that get bigger; or any severe or persistent bleeding

• Infection

• Adrenal gland problems like severe nausea, vomiting, severe dizziness, passing out, muscle weakness, severe fatigue, mood changes, lack of appetite, or weight loss

• Moon face

• Buffalo hump

• Severe loss of strength and energy

• Irritability

• Tremors

• Fast heartbeat

• Confusion

• Sweating a lot

• Dizziness

• Passing out

• Swelling of the ankles

• Severe headache

• Bone pain

• Vision changes

• Signs of a significant reaction like wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; seizures; or swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all side effects. Talk to your doctor if you have questions.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer: This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Further information

The content of Holevn is solely for the purpose of providing information about Thuốc Budesonide (Systemic)  and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please contact your nearest doctor or clinic, hospital for advice. We do not accept liability if the patient arbitrarily uses the drug without following a doctor’s prescription.

Reference from: https://www.drugs.com/ppa/budesonide-systemic.html

Cardiovascular: Chest pain (<5%), edema (<5%), facial edema (<5%), flushing (<5%), hypertension (<5%), palpitations (<5%), tachycardia (<5%)

Central nervous system: Dizziness (<5% to 7%), fatigue (3% to 5%), agitation (<5%), amnesia (<5%), confusion (<5%), drowsiness (<5%), insomnia (<5%), malaise (<5%), nervousness (<5%), paresthesia (<5%), sleep disorder (<5%), vertigo (<5%)

Dermatologic: Alopecia (<5%), dermatitis (<5%), dermatological disease (<5%), diaphoresis (<5%), eczema (<5%)

Endocrine & metabolic: Hirsutism (≤5%), hypokalemia (1% to <5%), intermenstrual bleeding (<5%), menstrual disease (<5%), weight gain (<5%), adrenocortical insufficiency (foam 4%; capsules >1%), redistribution of body fat (1%)

Gastrointestinal: Diarrhea (10%), dyspepsia (6%), anal disease (<5%), enteritis (<5%), epigastric pain (<5%), exacerbation of Crohn’s disease (<5%), gastrointestinal fistula (<5%), glossitis (<5%), hemorrhoids (<5%), increased appetite (<5%), intestinal obstruction (<5%), oral candidiasis (<5%), upper abdominal pain (3% to 4%), flatulence (3%), abdominal distention (2%), constipation (2%)

Genitourinary: Urinary tract infection (2% to <5%), dysuria (<5%), nocturia (<5%), urinary frequency (<5%), hematuria (≥1%), pyuria (≥1%)

Hematologic & oncologic: C-reactive protein increased (1% to <5%), leukocytosis (1% to <5%), purpura (<5%), abnormal neutrophils (≥1%), anemia (≥1%), increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (≥1%)

Hepatic: Increased serum alkaline phosphatase (≥1%)

Hypersensitivity: Tongue edema (<5%)

Infection: Viral infection (6%), abscess (<5%)

Neuromuscular & skeletal: Ankle edema (7%), arthralgia (5%), arthritis (≤5%), hyperkinesia (<5%), muscle cramps (<5%), myalgia (<5%), tremor (<5%), weakness (<5%)

Ophthalmic: Eye disease (<5%), visual disturbance (<5%)

Otic: Otic infection (<5%)

Respiratory: Sinusitis (8%), bronchitis (<5%), dyspnea (<5%), flu-like symptoms (<5%), pharyngeal disease (<5%), rhinitis (<5%)

Miscellaneous: Fever (<5%)

<1%, postmarketing, and/or case reports: Allergic dermatitis, anaphylaxis, emotional lability, hyperglycemia, maculopapular rash, pancreatitis, peripheral edema, pruritus, pseudotumor cerebri, rectal bleeding, skin rash

Warnings/Precautions

Concerns related to adverse effects:

• Adrenal suppression: May cause hypercortisolism or suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, particularly in younger children or in patients receiving high doses for prolonged periods. HPA axis suppression may lead to adrenal crisis. Withdrawal and discontinuation of a corticosteroid should be done slowly and carefully. Particular care is required when patients are transferred from systemic corticosteroids to inhaled products or corticosteroids with lower systemic effect due to possible adrenal insufficiency or withdrawal from steroids, including an increase in allergic symptoms. Adult patients receiving >20 mg per day of prednisone (or equivalent) may be most susceptible. Fatalities have occurred due to adrenal insufficiency in asthmatic patients during and after transfer from systemic corticosteroids to aerosol steroids; aerosol steroids do not provide the systemic steroid needed to treat patients having trauma, surgery, or infections.

• Anaphylactoid reactions: Rare cases of anaphylactoid reactions have been observed in patients receiving corticosteroids.

• Immunosuppression: Prolonged use of corticosteroids may increase the incidence of secondary infection, mask acute infection (including fungal infections), prolong or exacerbate viral infections, or limit response to killed or inactivated vaccines. Exposure to chickenpox or measles should be avoided; corticosteroids should not be used to treat ocular herpes simplex. Corticosteroids should not be used for cerebral malaria, fungal infections, viral hepatitis. Close observation is required in patients with latent tuberculosis and/or TB reactivity; restrict use in active TB (only fulminating or disseminated TB in conjunction with antituberculosis treatment). Amebiasis should be ruled out in any patient with recent travel to tropic climates or unexplained diarrhea prior to initiation of corticosteroids. Use with extreme caution in patients with Strongyloides infections; hyperinfection, dissemination and fatalities have occurred.

• Kaposi sarcoma: Prolonged treatment with corticosteroids has been associated with the development of Kaposi sarcoma (case reports); if noted, discontinuation of therapy should be considered (Goedert 2002).

• Myopathy: Acute myopathy has been reported with high-dose corticosteroids, usually in patients with neuromuscular transmission disorders; may involve ocular and/or respiratory muscles; monitor creatine kinase; recovery may be delayed.

• Psychiatric disturbances: Corticosteroid use may cause psychiatric disturbances, including euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, severe depression or psychotic manifestations. Preexisting psychiatric conditions may be exacerbated by corticosteroid use.

Disease-related concerns:

• Cardiovascular disease: Use with caution in patients with HF and/or hypertension; use has been associated with fluid retention, electrolyte disturbances, and hypertension. Use with caution following acute MI; corticosteroids have been associated with myocardial rupture.

• Diabetes: Use corticosteroids with caution in patients with diabetes mellitus; may alter glucose production/regulation leading to hyperglycemia.

• Gastrointestinal disease: Use with caution in patients with GI diseases (diverticulitis, fresh intestinal anastomoses, active or latent peptic ulcer, ulcerative colitis, abscess or other pyogenic infection) due to perforation risk.

• Hepatic impairment: Avoid use in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class C). Consider reduced dosage in patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class B); monitor for hypercortisolism. Long-term use of corticosteroids in patients with hepatic impairment, including cirrhosis, has been associated with fluid retention.

• Myasthenia gravis: Use with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis; exacerbation of symptoms has occurred especially during initial treatment with corticosteroids.

• Ocular disease: Use with caution in patients with cataracts and/or glaucoma; increased intraocular pressure, open-angle glaucoma, and cataracts have occurred with prolonged use. Consider routine eye exams in chronic users.

• Osteoporosis: Use with caution in patients with osteoporosis; high doses and/or long-term use of corticosteroids have been associated with increased bone loss and osteoporotic fractures.

• Renal impairment: Use with caution in patients with renal impairment; fluid retention may occur.

• Seizure disorders: Use corticosteroids with caution in patients with a history of seizure disorder; seizures have been reported with adrenal crisis.

• Systemic sclerosis: Use with caution in patients with systemic sclerosis; an increase in scleroderma renal crisis incidence has been observed with corticosteroid use. Monitor BP and renal function in patients with systemic sclerosis treated with corticosteroids (EULAR [Kowal-Bielecka 2017]).

• Thyroid disease: Changes in thyroid status may necessitate dosage adjustments; metabolic clearance of corticosteroids increases in hyperthyroid patients and decreases in hypothyroid ones.

Concurrent therapy issues:

• Drug-drug interactions: Potentially significant interactions may exist, requiring dose or frequency adjustment, additional monitoring, and/or selection of alternative therapy. Consult drug interactions database for more detailed information.

Dosage form specific issues:

• Polysorbate 80: Some dosage forms may contain polysorbate 80 (also known as Tweens). Hypersensitivity reactions, usually a delayed reaction, have been reported following exposure to pharmaceutical products containing polysorbate 80 in certain individuals (Isaksson 2002; Lucente 2000; Shelley 1995). Thrombocytopenia, ascites, pulmonary deterioration, and renal and hepatic failure have been reported in premature neonates after receiving parenteral products containing polysorbate 80 (Alade 1986; CDC 1984). See manufacturer’s labeling.

Monitoring Parameters

Serum glucose, electrolytes; blood pressure, weight and other growth parameters, presence of infection; monitor IOP with therapy >6 weeks; bone mineral density; assess HPA axis suppression (eg, ACTH stimulation test, morning plasma cortisol test, urinary free cortisol test)

Pregnancy Considerations

Some studies have shown an association between first trimester systemic corticosteroid use and oral clefts (Park-Wyllie 2000; Pradat 2003). Systemic corticosteroids may also influence fetal growth (decreased birth weight); however, information is conflicting (Lunghi 2010). Hypoadrenalism may occur in newborns following maternal use of corticosteroids in pregnancy (monitor). When systemic corticosteroids are needed in pregnancy, it is generally recommended to use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration of time, avoiding high doses during the first trimester (Leachman 2006; Lunghi 2010). Budesonide may be used for the induction of remission in pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease (Habal 2012; Nguyen 2016).

Patient Education

What is this drug used for?

• It is used to treat Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis.

• It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

Frequently reported side effects of this drug

• Common cold symptoms

• Heartburn

• Nausea

• Vomiting

• Diarrhea

• Passing gas

• Joint pain

• Back pain

• Abdominal pain

Other side effects of this drug: Talk with your doctor right away if you have any of these signs of:

• High blood sugar like confusion, fatigue, increased thirst, increased hunger, passing a lot of urine, flushing, fast breathing, or breath that smells like fruit

• Skin changes like acne, stretch marks, slow healing, or hair growth

• Bleeding like vomiting blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; coughing up blood; blood in the urine; black, red, or tarry stools; bleeding from the gums; abnormal vaginal bleeding; bruises without a reason or that get bigger; or any severe or persistent bleeding

• Infection

• Adrenal gland problems like severe nausea, vomiting, severe dizziness, passing out, muscle weakness, severe fatigue, mood changes, lack of appetite, or weight loss

• Moon face

• Buffalo hump

• Severe loss of strength and energy

• Irritability

• Tremors

• Fast heartbeat

• Confusion

• Sweating a lot

• Dizziness

• Passing out

• Swelling of the ankles

• Severe headache

• Bone pain

• Vision changes

• Signs of a significant reaction like wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; seizures; or swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all side effects. Talk to your doctor if you have questions.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer: This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Further information

The content of Holevn is solely for the purpose of providing information about Thuốc Budesonide (Systemic)  and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please contact your nearest doctor or clinic, hospital for advice. We do not accept liability if the patient arbitrarily uses the drug without following a doctor’s prescription.

Reference from: https://www.drugs.com/ppa/budesonide-systemic.html

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